BSRT Graduate School

Courses

Histology - Histological characterization of tissues and cells

7/10
Description:

This theoretical and practical basic histological course is designed for students from all scientific fields with no or just a minimal experience and background in histological analyses. The course will give an overview on the histology of tissue with a special focus on musculoskeletal tissue and its regeneration. Evaluation of tissue processes can be achieved by conventional stainings as well as cell interactions with immunohistological stainings. In lectures, we will teach basic knowledge about tissue anatomy, tissue preparation, different common staining methods as well as the scientific benefit and application possibilities of histological analyses. In the accompanying practical part, we will apply the theoretical knowledge on tissue samples including the tissue embedding process, the preparation of plastic and paraffin sections, different conventional and immunohistological staining procedures, microscopy and histomorphometry. An insight into nanoindentation and confocal microscopy will also be included in the course.

 

Course Materials and Techniques: different tissue samples, tissue handling for histology, basic histological preparation and staining methods, microtome, microscope, histomorphometry, nanoindentation, confocal microscopy
 

 

 

Day 1  (12/10/2022)   

9.00-10.00

Lecture: Tissue preparation and classical staining methods of connective tissues

Seminar Room A (0.0043); Franka Klatte-Schulz 

10.00-10.15

Break

10.15-16.00

Practical course: Preparation of plastic, cryo and paraffin sections

PMMA: Mineralized bone

Cryo: Soft tissue

Paraffin: Decalcified bone / Soft tissue

 

Group 1

Group 2

10.15-11.45

PMMA samples

Room: 1.0177

Sabine Stumpp, Marzena Princ

Cryo samples (2 persons)

Room: 1.0166 Gabriela Korus

Paraffin samples (2 persons)

Room: 1.0175 Aysha Schmock

11.45-12.45

Lunch break

12.45-14.15

Cryo samples (2 persons)

Room: 1.0166 Gabriela Korus

PMMA samples

Room: 1.0177

Sabine Stumpp, Marzena Princ

Paraffin samples (2 persons)

Room: 1.0175 Aysha Schmock

14.15-14.30

Break

14.30-16.00

 

Classic histological staining

Room: 1.0166

Sabine Stumpp, Marzena Princ

Introduction into µCT

Room: 01.0017

Mario Thiele

 

 

 

Day 2 (13/10/22)

 

9.00-10.00

Lecture: Specialized staining methods and visualization

Seminar Room A (0.0043); Christian Bucher

10.00-16.00

Practical demonstrations

Group 1

Group 2

10.00-11.30

Introduction into µCT

Room: 01.0017

Mario Thiele

10.00-11.30

Classic histological staining

Room: 1.0166

Sabine Stumpp, Marzena Princ

11.30-12.15

Lunch break

12.15-14.00

Immunohistochemistry

Room: 1.0166

Gabriela Korus

 

12.15-13.30

Introduction in histomorphometry

Room: 1.0015

Mario Thiele

13.30-14.00

Introduction into Nanoindentation

Room: 1.0177

Dag Wulsten

14.00-14.15

Break

14.15-15.30

Introduction in histomorphometry

Room: 1.0015

Mario Thiele

14.14-16.00

Immunohistochemistry

Room: 1.0166

Gabriela Korus

 

15.30-16.00

Introduction into Nanoindentation

Room: 1.0177

Dag Wulsten

 

 

Day 3 (14/10/22)

  

9.00-11.30

Practical demonstrations

Group 1

Group 2

9.00-10.15

 

Microscopy and Histo Quiz

Seminar Room C (1.0028)

Franka Klatte-Schulz

9.00-9.15

Introduction into confocal microscopy/Epifluorescence

Seminar Room B (0.0028)

Aaron Herrera, Christian Bucher

9.15-10.15

Confocal microscopy

Room: 1.0169

Aaron Herrera

Epifluorescence

Room: 1.0003

Mario Thiele

10.15-10.30

Introduction into confocal microscopy/Epifluorescence

Seminar Room B (0.0028)

Aaron Herrera, Christian Bucher

10.15-11.30

 

Microscopy and Histo Quiz

Seminar Room C (1.0028)

Franka Klatte-Schulz

10.30-11.30

Confocal microscopy

Room: 1.0169

Aaron Herrera

Epifluorescence

Room: 1.0003

Mario Thiele

11.30-13.00

Lunch and Feedback

Foyer

Franka Klatte-Schulz, Christian Bucher

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Immunology - Dysfunction of the immune system and therapeutic options

5/8
Description:

Participants will first receive a brief overview of the cellular components of the immune system and its strategies and mechanisms used to prevent the spread of pathogens and their products. This will include a summary of the organization of the immune system, its strategies for responding to pathogens, and the major cellular components of innate and adaptive responses. Participants will learn how specific inborn errors of immunity affect the immune system and how certain drugs used in the treatment of diseases can cause unintended immune dysfunctions. Case studies highlighting different aspects of immune response in the context of increased susceptibility to infections as well as increased risk of immune dysregulation are presented. Participants will learn about diagnostic approaches including functional assays, flow cytometry and genetics. Treatment options are presented including immunoglobulin therapy, Jak-inhibitors and other immunosuppressive medications.

 

Schedule

09.00 – 10.00 Seminar: Brief overview of the cellular components of the immune system and their role in the human body
Michael Schmück-Henneresse

 

10.00 – 10.15 Short Break

 

10.15 – 11.45 Seminar: Inborn errors of immunity – from symptoms to diagnostics to treatment

Leif Hanitsch

 

11.45 – 13.00 Lunch Break

 

13.00 – 14.30 Seminar: Immunology and Transplantation

Nina Babel

 

14.30 – 14.45 Short Break

 

14.45 – 16.45 Seminar and Visit to the Clinic: Dysfunctions of the immune system in cancer patients

Il-Kang Na

 

Requirements

For optimal comprehension, students should have an entry-level understanding of molecular and cellular biology - with emphasis on gene expression, protein synthesis, signalling molecules and cellular receptors.

 

 


Stem Cells - Organoids: from generation to their wide applications

6/8
Description:

Moving from 2D to 3D cellular systems, we will address in vitro and ex vivo organoid generation techniques discussing their limitations and shedding light on recent advances in the field. We will delve into the wide-ranging applications of organoids in disease modelling, diagnosis and personalized medicine with specific attention to research interest of participants. The course will focus on organoid generation in terms of practical skills as well as basic knowledge on human developmental biology important to set the basis for protocol establishment. Attending this course will equip you with theoretical and technical knowledge needed to develop your own organoid protocols and solve the possible difficulties.

 

Duration

The course comprises 2 days with lectures on techniques to generate and maintain 3D cell culture models/organoids. Overview of functional assays important to answer specific research questions will be also taken into account. We will adapt the content as much as possible for the participants (tissue of interest) so that each student can have an idea regarding the possibilities of utilizing organoid technology in their own fields/project.

 

Eligibility

This course addresses PhD students who have at least a basic knowledge of cell culture, stem cells and would like to apply 3D organoid models.

 


Biomaterials - Pro-regenerative biomaterials for tissue regeneration

10/13
Description:

Course format: seminar and hands-on sessions

Requirements: prior knowledge of biomaterials research or 3D printing is not required

 

This course will introduce you to the role of biomaterials, from their use as a research tool to their application in in vivo tissue regeneration. We will provide both, the background of biomaterial chemistry, fabrication and pro-regenerative function as well as their handling and the requirements for in vivo application. Due to the wide application of biomaterials in the orthopedic field, the focus will be on bone regeneration, but examples from other fields and future biomaterial developments for other organs will also be covered. Overall, you will learn how biomaterials have evolved from passive support structures replacing damaged tissue to bioactive pro-regenerative tools for tissue regeneration targeting individual cell functions.

 

Classes of biomaterials, their chemical basis and methods for their fabrication will be presented and disussed in an interactive format. A special focus will be on additive manufacturing (3D printing), that has recently attracted enormous attention in the biomaterial field and is considered the technology of the future for the fabrication of architecture and/or patient-specific biomaterials. For full tissue regeneration, the biomaterial has to vanish over time and hand over function to endogenously formed tissue. Thus, aspects of biomaterial degradation from a chemical and biological perspective will be another focus of the course. Next to their chemical properties, the internal architecture and the mechanical properties of biomaterials have been shown to be relevant cues to recruit cells and to support their differentiation into tissue-specific cells driving tissue regeneration. Recent findings on this topic will be presented and future concepts based on advancing technical possibilities through additive manufacturing will be discussed.

 

The theoretical understanding will be consolidated by practical experience with different biomaterials in the lab. You will have the opportunity to develop your own biomaterial design for a specific clinical problem on the drawing board, transfer it to a computer model (no experience with CAD software required), materialize your idea using a 3D printer in the lab and test the functionality of your “product” in respect to its application. Furthermore, a spectrum of biomaterial concepts developed in the BCRT/BSRT network will be presented in the lab and you will have the opportunity to experience their handling properties and learn how these properties relate to in vivo functionality. Aspects of cell seeding, biomaterial implantation and clinical applicability will also be discussed. If you are using or developing biomaterials in your own research project, you will also have the opportunity to discuss your own research questions regarding these biomaterials.

 


Cardiovascular System

6/8
Description:

Description: Introduction: What is heart disease, why do we need regenerative medicine - How to diagnose heart disease – visit echo and MRI - How can the cardiologist treat heart disease – visit cath lab - How heart surgery is done – visit OR - Treatment of patients on the ICU – visit ICU - Heart transplantation and mechanical assist devices for heart failure – visit transplant & assist - How to prepare stem cell products for cardiac cell therapy – visit clean room lab - Viable tissues for heart surgery – visit tissue engineering lab - Intrinsic regeneration of the myocardium (Neoangiogenesis, Myocyte mitosis vs. hypertrophy) - Experimental strategies for cell-based cardiac regeneration (library, Skeletal myoblasts, Embryonic stem cells, Bone marrow cells, Neonatal stem cells, Gene therapy) - Clinical cell therapy for heart disease


Advanced Technologies – Pre-Clinical Model Systems

3/12
Description:

This course offers a 2.5-day advanced training on preclinical animal models.

 

The course starts with a short discourse on the history of animal experimentation in science, covers regulatory aspects and will introduce the 3Rs principle, which has evolved into 6Rs and could even be extended to 7Rs. Furthermore, animal experimental work will be discussed from an ethical point of view and alternatives to in vivo research will be addressed. New technologies such as the use of genetic modifications and resulting test systems will also be a topic. In this context, the time required to create a transgenic animal model will also be addressed and its advantages and disadvantages discussed. The goal of trying to mirror clinical patient conditions in animal models will be challenged.

 

The course will include some introductory lectures but aims to engage you in lively discussions stimulated by group exercises.

 

Skeletal Development - Investigating skeletal development in the mouse

3/4
Description:

This practical course gives an introduction into the methods and technology used to investigate skeletal and muscle development in the mouse. The skeleton evolves from mesenchymal cells which differentiate into bone forming osteoblasts and cartilage forming chondrocytes. Through a complex genetic program these cells eventually form the mature bone, keep this tissue in homeostasis and provide a cellular resource for healing. Muscles on the other hand form from progenitors arising in the somites, which reach their final destionations via a migration process. During muscle formation a subpopulation of myogenic cells is arrested in the undifferentiatied state and serves as stem cells (so-called satellite cells) for regenerative processes in the adult. In this course, the participants will be able to investigate gene and protein expression during skeletogenesis and myogenesis in the mouse and to analyze skeletal malformations in mouse models for human skeletal disease. This course is aimed at providing a basic understanding for the genetic mechanisms that govern musculoskeletal patterning and differentiation during embryogenesis and to provide knowledge on how to analyze musculoskeletal phenotypes in animal models.

 

Course Materials and Techniques

The onset of skeletal and myogenic development in the embryo will be analyzed by RNA in-situ hybridisation, the formation of muscles and muscle stem cells will be analized by immunostaining on tissue sections. The differentiation of cartilage and bone will be analyzed by histology of embryonic tissue sections. The patterning and morphogenesis of the skeleton will be analyzed in wild type and mutant mice by whole mount skeletal staining.


Clinical Training - Musculoskeletal Anatomy

13/20
Description:

During this course the students will be provided with the basic knowledge about the anatomy of the motion apparatus. A lot of examples from orthopedic and traumatologic allday will support the theoretic insight and enable the students to understand clinical problems, evolving around the anatomic field. A workshop, which will take place in the Institute for Anatomy of the Campus Charité Mitte will allow the participants to get in touch with "real" anatomy in form of specimens of extremities and to get a deeper understanding of the acquired knowledge.


Teaching - Student Centered Coaching

4/10
Description:

This course offers a two-day workshop on student-centered coaching methods. In short seminars, you will learn about problem based learning (PBL) methods and other methods such as Design Thinking that are used to encourage knowledge acquisition and problem solving through group collaboration. You will learn when and why a coach is required and about the different roles a coach can assume. In teamwork, you will design and plan the PBL sessions for the next BSRT course “Introduction into research in regenerative therapies”. You will get hands-on experience in coaching during one PBL session of the following BSRT introduction course under the supervision of Fabian Feutlinske. One PBL session takes usually no more than half a day. During the PBL sessions, you will guide the teams of new doctoral researcher and help them in their transition from students who are used to passively acquire knowledge in lectures and from text books to becoming the next generation of researcher who take matters into their own hands and solve problems independently.

 

Requirements

You need to have already participated in the BSRT course “Introduction into research in regenerative therapies”

 

Tutor

Fabian Feutlinske has a PhD in Biochemisty and Molecular Biology from the Freie Universität Berlin and several years of coaching experience. He moderated the PBL sessions in the BSRT introduction courses and he has been the BioThinking Coach in various research projects funded by the Einstein Center for Regenerative Therapies.

 

Duration

Two workshop days and one day hands-on experience in the following BSRT course “Introduction into research in regenerative therapies”.


Career Orientation - What Does it Mean To Do a PhD?

6/12
Description:

What does it mean to do your PhD?

From successful project management to the daily challenges in translational research

 

In this interactive workshop, we will discuss your expectations for doing a PhD and how to integrate those these expectations into the daily routines at your host institution. Knowing your own goals and the goals and expectations of your team members is key to successful PhD project management. We will discuss the basics of project management and how to:

  • Set realistic milestones for a research project and career development (Phase I)
  • Deal with setbacks, manage frustrating unexpected outcomes, and develop strategies that will make you more resilient (Phase II)
  • Build rewarding collaborations with other researchers on a translational team (Phase III)

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